Dorothy Bode’s NPR interview on transracial adoption

NPR interviewed one of our blog’s writers, Dorothy Bode, about transracial adoption. You can listen to part one of this interview (7 min 44 sec) here. Dorothy did an excellent job! Have you listened to it yet? If not, you should. It’s only about 7 minutes long.

The interview (on NPR’s Day to Day news program) was prompted by the just-released Evan B Donaldson Adoption Institute report titled “Finding Families for African American Children: The Role of Race & Law in Adoption from Foster Care.” In the report, the Institute discusses continuing obstacles to the adoption of African American children in the U.S. foster care system.

In the interview, Dorothy Bode discusses her own experiences as the (white) adoptive mother of six black and bi-racial children — and three biological children.

Dorothy is humorous, articulate, and endearing. She talks about the decisions she and her husband have made to keep their children connected to African American culture (for example, moving from the suburbs into the inner-city and attending a church with three black or bi-racial pastors). She also talks about how her family discusses race in a frank way that works for everyone in the family (vanilla and chocolate).

Hearing the interview made me proud to be associated with Dorothy through the blog. She was a great representative of adoptive parents and of her faith.

John Stossel on US intervention in the Guatemala adoption system

Over at the conservative website Townhall.com, John Stossel (formerly of 20/20) writes an eyebrow-raising piece called USA Makes Adoption Harder. I want to be very clear that some of Stossel’s statements make me uncomfortable, and this is not an endorsement of Stossel’s article. But much of what he says is a simple reality, however unpopular it is to say. Incidentally, notice that Stossel adopts the language of adoption opponents when he uses the expression “baby broker”; he’s not endorsing the idea that actual baby-brokering is moral.

Here are some highlights from the article:

The State Department says the Guatemalan adoption system “unduly enriches” so-called baby brokers and that “Guatemala has not established the required central authority to oversee intercountry adoption.”

“Central authority”? This from our government? They sound like Soviet apparatchiks.

Continue reading

Bella, the movie: abortion, adoption, and love

There’s a new independent film out that compassionately deals with abortion and adoption: Bella, winner of the Toronto Film Festival People’s Choice Awards. I haven’t seen it, but I’ve read good things about it. Below is an excerpt from the movie review at Focus on the Family’s Plugged In Online. You can also find information at the review about the movie’s (apparently minimal) objectionable elements.

Bella the movieEduardo Verástegui [the lead actor] knows his little film (he also co-produced it) won’t dominate the box office. But he doesn’t mind. “I was caught up in the stardom and money of this business, like so many actors,” he told us, “But I was drawn to do this. To just do something worthwhile.” Thus, he and his fellow producers stepped away from successful careers to pursue an independent film with no guarantees. He said with emotion, “What I’d love to see happen with this film is to someday have this 12-year-old knock on my door and say that her mother was going to have an abortion. But she saw this film. That would be my Oscar.” Continue reading

Amazing Liberian Adoption Story

Amazing Liberian Adoption StoryOn January 29 of this year, Oprah Winfrey aired a show about a group of Christian families in the same community who adopted pre-teen and teenager boys from a Liberian orphanage. The story is remarkable, and I encourage all of our readers to read about it at Lysa TerKeurst’s website. (Hat tip to Rob Singleton of Southbrook Church for pointing me to the story. I believe Rob is the pastor to some or all of these families.)

Global Warming, Kyoto, and International Adoption

global-warming-and-adoptionThis morning, Bjorn Lomborg, author of Cool It: The Skeptical Environmentalist’s Guide to Global Warming was interviewed on NPR’s Morning Edition. Mr. Lomborg believes that global warming is a reality, and he believes that human activity is contributing to the problem. However, he rejects solutions like the Kyoto Protocol, because he believes these types of initiatives take the focus off more immediate global problems (AIDS, access to clean water) — problems that we can attack more efficiently and with benefit to far more people. (Hang on and keep reading. I’ll get to the adoption connection soon!)

Lomborg believes that the global community should encourage economic growth, and that we should seize on that growth to further develop technologies that would (eventually) put us in a position to produce energy with minimal carbon emissions. If I understand Lomborg’s position correctly, he thinks that Continue reading

Al Jazeera, JCICS, and adoption (part 2)

Two days ago I posted about an adoption interview/debate on Al Jazeera’s English network. This post is about the second half of that interview with Tom DiFilipo, President and CEO of the Joint Council on International Children’s Services (JCICS), and Louise Melville, a Care and Protection Adviser for Save The Children.

You can watch the clip of the 2nd half of the interview below, and (if you’re interested) you can read my commentary below the interview. If you cannot see the interview below, you can go to the interview on YouTube.

Part 2:
(Click on the play button in the center of the box or at the bottom of the box to watch the video right here. If you click anywhere else in the box, you will be taken to YouTube’s website.)

Now for my own summary of the inteview’s key points, along with some additional comments of my own:

Anti-Adoption Language

This topic — the language used to discuss international adoption — greatly interests me, especially because Continue reading

Al Jazeera, JCICS, and adoption (part 1)

The English wing of the Arab news network Al Jazeera produced a piece last month about international adoption on their “Inside Story” program: “Guatemala Adoption Scandal” aired on 13 August 2007. The program featured two interviewees who went head-to-head on inter-country adoption: Tom DiFilipo, President and CEO of the Joint Council on International Children’s Services (JCICS), and Louise Melville, a Care and Protection Adviser for Save The Children.

This piece came to my attention not because I’m a regular Al Jazeera watcher, but because Carolina Hope is a member of JCICS, which advocates for international children’s welfare and supports international adoption as a legitimate option for providing permanency to children in need of homes.

I’m dividing this topic into two posts because the television program is available on the internet in 2 segments (and I only have time to blog about one of those today!) You can watch the first clip below, and (if you’re interested) you can read my commentary below the interview. If you cannot see the interview below, you can go to the interview on YouTube.

Part 1:
(If you click on the main box, you will be taken to the YouTube website. If you simply click on the play button at the bottom of the box, you can watch the video right here.)

[09/07/07 update: You can now view and read about part 2 of this interview here.]

Now for my own summary of the inteview’s key points, along with some additional comments of my own:

The Role of Inter-Country Adoptions

In part 1, the interviewer asks Tom and Louise about the role of inter-country adoption in the broader spectrum of solutions available for Continue reading